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BVD Virus Antigens in Tissues of Persistently Viraemic, Clinically Normal Cattle: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Clinically Fatal Disease

Abstract

The cellular events involved in precipitation of the clinically fatal outcome of an infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) remain unresolved, though it is now known that this course of the infection, Mucosal Disease (MD), only occurs in calves persistently infected with non-cytopathic BVDV. In studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis of MD, the distribution of BVDV antigens and infectious virus in tissues of persistently infected, clinically normal calves was investigated. Virus antigen was detected in most tissues, in epithelial and immune cells. No signs of an inflammatory response were detected and cytopathological changes were subtle or absent. The infection may nevertheless create a cell-environment which will enhance replication of cytopathic virus. Variations in the clinical, pathomorphologies and virological appearance of MD-cases may depend on both the host-reactions, including virus-induced immunopathology, and the virus-strain combinations in a putative mixed infection.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Danish Agricultural and Veterinary Research Council (grant nos. SJVF 13-3681 and 13-3857) and »Landbrugets Hudefond«, Copenhagen, DK. H. Bielefeldt Ohmann is a senior fellow of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University of Copenhagen. Thanks are due to Irene Kosokowsky for typing the manuscript.

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Ohmann, H.B. BVD Virus Antigens in Tissues of Persistently Viraemic, Clinically Normal Cattle: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Clinically Fatal Disease. Acta Vet Scand 29, 77–84 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1186/BF03548395

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Keywords

  • bovine viral diarrhoea virus
  • persistent infection
  • tissue distribution
  • immunocytochemistry, viral pathogenesis.
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